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History.YR5.Unit Summary.The Australian Colonies. Convicts and Colonies

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Grade Level:  5
Duration:  1 term / 10 weeks / Approx. 1 hr per week
# of Pages:  5
Format:  Word Format.
Editable.  YES

Note: Unit Summaries include an overview only. Lesson Plans can be purchased separately or alternately you can purchase a Term Pack which includes the Unit Summary and all Lesson Plans/ worksheets.


ACARA Title: The Australian Colonies.  

A study of colonial Australia in the 1800s. Students look at the founding of British colonies and the development of a colony, including the reasons why Britain established colonies in Australia. They will be introduced to mapping skills and will understand the impact that settlement had on the natural environment.

They will learn about what life was like for different groups of people in the colonial period. Finally, they will utilise all information learnt to construct a narrative.

Students will develop historical understanding through key concepts including sources, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance.
General Capabilities:

Literacy | Intercultural understanding | Personal and social capability | Information and communication technology capability | Critical and creative thinking | Numeracy | Ethical behaviour

Cross Curriculum Priorities:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Asia and Australia´s engagement with Asia
Sustainability

Content Descriptions:

Reasons (economic, political and social) for the establishment of British colonies in Australia after 1800.
The nature of convict or colonial presence, including the factors that influenced patterns of development, aspects of the daily life of the inhabitants (including Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islander Peoples) and how the environment changed.

Elaborations:

Investigating the reasons for the establishment of one or more British colonies such as a penal colony (for example Moreton Bay, Van Diemen’s Land) or a colony that later became a state (for example Western Australia, Victoria)
Investigating colonial life to discover what life was like at that time for different inhabitants (for example a European family and an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Language group, a convict and a free settler, a sugar cane farmer and an indentured labourer) in terms of clothing, diet, leisure, paid and unpaid work, language, housing and childrens' lives'.
Mapping local, regional and state/territory rural and urban settlement patterns in the 1800s, and noting factors such as geographical features, climate, water resources, the discovery of gold, transport and access to port facilities that shaped these patterns
Investigating the impact of settlement on the environment (for example comparing the present and past landscape and the flora and fauna of the local community)


Key Inquiry Questions:     

What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?
How did an Australian colony develop over time and why?
How did colonial settlement change the environment?
What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies?   

Sequence of Learning Activities:

1. Introduction – share some youtube clips to set the scene. 

2. Reasons for the establishment of British colonies. 

3. Economic, political and social reasons for establishing the British penal colony of Moreton Island and/or Van Diemen’s Land. 

4. Mapping local, regional and state/territory rural and urban settlement patterns in the 1800s. Discuss what a pattern is and how one is developed and identified. Review definitions of rural and urban (see definitions) Use an atlas to show how information is presented. 

5. Investigate the impact of settlement on the environment (for example comparing the present and past landscape and the flora and fauna of the local community). 

6. Investigate colonial life to discover what life was like at that time for different inhabitants:  

7. Investigate colonial life to discover what life was like at that time for different inhabitants: 

8. Narrative writing - planning. Students will need to plan an historical narrative based on what they have learnt this term. 

9. Narrative writing – drafting and editing. Students will complete a full draft. Once they have finished this work, they should self edit, peer edit and conference with the teacher.

10. Presentation of stories. Students should publish their stories, either on paper of using the computer. These could then be read or shown to the class.   

Historical Skills:

Chronology, terms and concepts
Sequence historical people and events
Use historical terms

Historical questions and research
Pose a range of questions about the past
Identify sources

Analysis and use of sources
Locate relevant information from sources provided

Perspectives and interpretations
Identify different points of view 

Explanation and communication
Develop texts, particularly narratives
Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies


Possible Assessment:

Students can write an historical narrative about a person in the early 1800s. It must include facts and historical terminology.   


Adjustments for Learning Needs:

Teachers should take into account the requirements for ascertained and non-ascertained students and what their individual plans outline. Generally students with exceptional needs will require a reduction in content, scaffolding of tasks, individualised instruction, a list of websites to utilize during research activities (rather than looking for their own), a buddy/partner/small group for support.

Gifted and Talented students will require a larger supply of higher order thinking activities. These may include compare and contrast or classify as opposed to find and sort information.

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